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Viking Expeditions Cruises – NEW! Into the Northwest Passage (Canada, Greenland) 13 Days

0
  • 13 Days
  • River Cruise
  • 2 Countries

Map of NEW! Into the Northwest Passage itinerary

Majestic scenery of the Arctic

Discover the rugged landscapes and awe-inspiring nature of the Arctic Circle. Immerse yourself in Inuit customs and traditions while exploring towns dotted with colorful wooden houses. Witness the towering peaks of Greenland and the blue-tinged glaciers of the Canadian High Arctic, as you kayak pristine fjords, or partake in a thrilling Zodiac landing. Join Viking on a once-in-life-time voyage to remote territories beneath the skies of the midnight sun.

Arctic ice

Departure & Return Location

Nuuk, Greenland / Nuuk, Greenland

Departure Dates/Times

2025 Sailings from July to September

* Please check with us for dates & pricing

Rates

Cruise fare from $16,195.0 per person

* Please check with us for dates & pricing

What's Included

Itinerary

Day 1Nuuk, Greenland

Embark your ship and settle into your stateroom. Cosmopolitan Nuuk is Greenland’s capital city and one of the smallest in the world, with just 16,000 residents. Located on the southwest coast, the city is home to one of the world’s largest fjords, the Nuup Kangerlua Fjord, whose waters are brimming with marine life; whale sightings are commonplace in these waters. Visitors to Nuuk come to enjoy nature, hiking along the dramatic coastline or exploring the fjord by boat or kayak. Its rugged landscape is dotted with colorful houses, set amid a beautiful backdrop of the Sermitsiaq mountain.

Day 2Nuuk, Greenland

Nuuk’s first Inuit settlers arrived on Greenland’s shores from the Canadian Arctic approximately 4,500 years ago, and its people have long celebrated their indigenous roots. In the city’s boutique stores, knitwear designs are woven with Inuit patterns and local art showcases the blend of modern Danish and traditional cultures. The city’s architectural highlights are centered around Colonial Harbor, with its plethora of colorful residences. Nuuk’s showpiece however is the Katuaq Cultural Center, which was inspired by the northern lights and surrounding mountain landscapes.

Day 3Scenic Sailing: Itilleq Fjord

Greenland’s west coast is one of the Arctic region’s spectacularly scenic highways and a favored transportation route for Greenlanders. Iceberg-filled waters drift past changing landscapes, evoking experiences that were once followed by intrepid explorers for centuries. Alfred Wegener, largely regarded today as the founding father of the theory of continental drift, participated in several expeditions to Greenland. His journey provided the inspiration for John Buchan’s 1933 novel, A Prince of the Captivity.

Day 4Ilulissat, Greenland

Home to a rich Arctic heritage, Ilulissat sits along pristine waters at the mouth of its namesake ice fjord. The town’s colorful houses enjoy a front row seat as icebergs drift by. This endless parade of white floating islands, long studied by glaciologists, has earned the ice fjord status as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The fjord is fed by Jakobshavn Glacier—one of the fastest moving glaciers in the world, producing massive icebergs that can be seen drifting out to sea. The town is named for its spectacular scenery; Ilulissat is the local Kalaallisut word for icebergs.

Day 5Uummannaq, Greenland

Founded as a Danish colony in 1758, the town’s heart-shaped mountain looms over the rugged landscape and casts a red-hued glow during summer, thanks to the ever-present midnight sun. Historic buildings line the harbor and the town’s history is well-documented at the Uummannaq Museum. The oldest human remains in Greenland were discovered here, preserved for more than 500 years. The Museum pays tribute to Alfred Wegener, who set sail from these shores for his final expedition in 1930. He died on Greenland’s ice cap after successfully delivering supplies for a rescue mission.

Day 6Sail Baffin Bay

Sail Baffin Bay, named after Lieutenant William Baffin, who traversed these waters in May 1616. It is an important part of the Arctic ecosystem, covered in sea ice for much of the year, with floating remnants during summer. As you sail today, attend an informative lecture or watch a film on our 8k laser-projected panoramic screen in The Aula, one of the world’s most advanced venues for learning at sea. This indoor-outdoor experience allows nature to take center stage with its retractable floor-to-ceiling windows that unveil 270° views.

Day 7Pond Inlet, Canada

Pond Inlet sits on the northern shores of Baffin Island at the eastern entrance to the famed Northwest Passage. Home to a small but vibrant Inuit community, it is nicknamed the “Jewel of the North,” the surrounding Arctic landscape a panoramic mix of glaciers, icebergs and rugged mountains. Pond Inlet is also a gateway to Sirmilik National Park, “the place of the glaciers” in the local language. Covering more than 8,400 sq mi, the park is a declared migratory bird sanctuary and supports an array of Arctic wildlife, including polar bears, wolves, narwhals and beluga whales.

Day 8Explore the Canadian High Arctic

A region of raw natural beauty, the Canadian High Arctic is characterized by extremely cold temperatures and extended periods of darkness. Explorers long sailed the treacherous waters in search of the famed Northwest Passage; historic Beechey Island is the final resting place for members of the ill-fated Franklin Expedition. Dundas Harbour was once a remote outpost for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and became a base for various Arctic expeditions, while Cape Hay features dramatic coastal cliffs, sweeping vistas and unique Arctic wildlife.

Day 9Sail Baffin Bay

Learn about the array of marine life in Baffin Bay, a feeding ground for fish, birds and mammals, including the Arctic flounder, fourhorn sculpin, seals and whales. Soak up the views from the Finse Terrace, a unique outdoor lounge area named after a famous mountain plateau in south-central Norway. Relax amid your surroundings in comfort, with heated couches and lava rock “firepits,” allowing you to enjoy the outdoors no matter the temperature, as you admire the dramatic scenery or expansive ocean vistas.

Day 10Sisimiut, Greenland

Greenland’s second-largest city is regarded as a gateway to adventure. The town is surrounded by soaring mountains and wide glacial valleys, and a number of beautiful hikes can be enjoyed offering scenic vistas. Several open-air exhibits are on display at the Sisimiut Museum, as well as a collection of 18th- and 19th-century old buildings, the entrances to which are marked by a set of whale jawbones. Traditional kayaks can be seen along the shores, exploring the region as the Inuit do. The origins of the word kayak come from the Greenlandic word qajaq.

Day 11Nuuk, Greenland

Cosmopolitan Nuuk is Greenland’s capital city and one of the smallest in the world, with just 16,000 residents. Located on the southwest coast, the city is home to one of the world’s largest fjords, the Nuup Kangerlua Fjord, whose waters are brimming with marine life; whale sightings are commonplace in these waters. Visitors to Nuuk come to enjoy nature, hiking along the dramatic coastline or exploring the fjord by boat or kayak. Its rugged landscape is dotted with colorful houses, set amid a beautiful backdrop of the Sermitsiaq mountain. After breakfast, disembark your ship and journey home.

Additional Info

* One shore excursion included per port; all others available at an extra charge.

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